Educational Learning and Technology

What is an education blog?

An education blog (weblog) created for educational purposes. Blogs offer a huge instructional potential as an online resource. There are many ways to use an education blog they offer many benefits. Blogging comes in many forms, it addresses countless topics, and it can, without a doubt, be divided by its quality. But when it comes to education, blogging can be an excellent tool for improving a student’s involvement, excitement, and most importantly, writing skills.

The benefits of blogging are tremendous, especially for young people. They can develop much improved writing skills which will stick with them forever, their thinking muscles will be in continuous development, and they will also develop a better understanding of the world that surrounds them. To focus on study and avoid distraction from social media and get study oriented to achieve your goals used iFocusMode app, which help to focus o your goals.

In addition to experiential knowledge drawn from educational practice, educational technology is based on theoretical knowledge that emerges from various disciplines such as communication, education, psychology, sociology, artificial intelligence, and computer science, among others. Educational technology is the combined use of computer hardware, software, and educational theory and practice to facilitate learning. Educational technology creates, uses, and manages technological processes and educational resources to help improve user academic performance.

The extent to which e-learning assists or replaces other learning and teaching approaches is variable, ranging on a continuum from none to fully online distance learning.

Synchronous and asynchronous:

E-learning may either be synchronous or asynchronous. Synchronous learning occurs in real-time, with all participants interacting at the same time, while asynchronous learning is self-paced and allows participants to engage in the exchange of ideas or information without the dependency of other participants′ involvement at the same time.

Synchronous learning refers to the exchange of ideas and information with one or more participants during the same period. Examples are face-to-face discussion, online real-time live teacher instruction and feedback, Skype conversations, and chat rooms or virtual classrooms where everyone is online and working collaboratively at the same time.

Asynchronous learning may use technologies such as learning management systems, email, blogs, wikis, and discussion boards, as well as web-supported textbooks, hypertext documents, audio video courses, and social networking. At the professional educational level, training may include virtual operating rooms.

Linear learning:

Computer-based training (CBT) refers to self-paced learning activities delivered on a computer or handheld device such as a tablet or smartphone.CBT initially delivered content via CD-ROM, and typically presented content linearly, much like reading an online book or manual. Assessing learning in a CBT is often by assessments that can be easily scored by a computer such as multiple-choice questions, drag-and-drop, radio button, simulation or other interactive means. Assessments are easily scored and recorded via online software, providing immediate end-user feedback and completion status.

Collaborative learning:

Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) uses instructional methods designed to encourage or require students to work together on learning tasks, allowing social learning. CSCL is similar in concept to the terminology, “e-learning 2.0 and “networked collaborative learning” (NCL).

Sharing information between multiple people in a network has become much easier and use has increased. One of the main reasons for its usage states that it is “a breeding ground for creative and engaging educational endeavors.

Flipped classroom:

This is an instructional strategy in which computer-assisted teaching is integrated with classroom instruction. Students are given basic essential instruction, such as lectures, before class instead of during class. Instructional content is delivered outside of the classroom, often online.

Computers, tablets and mobile devices:

Collaborative learning is a group-based learning approach in which learners are mutually engaged in a coordinated fashion to achieve a learning goal or complete a learning task. With recent developments in smartphone technology, the processing powers and storage capabilities of modern mobiles allow for advanced development and the use of apps.

Computers and tablets enable learners and educators to access websites as well as applications. Many mobile devices support m-learning. Mobile learning can provide performance support for checking the time, setting reminders, retrieving worksheets, and instruction manuals.

Collaborative and social learning:

Group webpages, blogs, wikis, and Twitter allow learners and educators to post thoughts, ideas, and comments on a website in an interactive learning environment. Social networking sites are virtual communities for people interested in a particular subject to communicate by voice, chat, instant message, video conference, or blogs.

Virtual classroom:

A virtual learning environment (VLE), also known as a learning platform, simulates a virtual classroom or meetings by simultaneously mixing several communication technologies. Web conferencing software enables students and instructors to communicate with each other via webcam, microphone, and real-time chatting in a group setting. A virtual classroom provides an opportunity for students to receive direct instruction from a qualified teacher in an interactive environment. Learners can have direct and immediate access to their instructor for instant feedback and direction.

Learning management system:

A learning management system (LMS) is software used for delivering, tracking and managing training and education. It tracks data about attendance, time on task, and student progress. Educators can post announcements, grade assignments, check on course activity, and participate in class discussions. Students can submit their work, read and respond to discussion questions, and take quizzes.

The educational system is constantly adapting and changing, looking for the latest trend or quickest solution to a problem. However, blogging is a worthwhile long-term investment worthy of implementing into your curriculum or teaching plan.

Students who participate in educational blogging are undertaking a commitment to work on their studies on a more in-depth level than simple rote memorisation cannot offer. Additionally, the skills students learn with blogging will benefit them in their future educational efforts as well as future careers.

Benefits:

  • Reduce Cost & Increase Access.
  • Helps Develop Communication Skills.
  • Diversity promotes creativity and problem solving skills.
  • Helps Motivate Students.

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